Viburnum lentago, the nannyberry, sheepberry, or sweet viburnum, is a species of Viburnum native to North America. Small, creamy white flowers in 4 1/4-inch, flat-topped to slightly domed clusters. Wild Flowers: An Aid to Knowledge of our Wild Flowers and their Insect Visitors, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Viburnum_lentago&oldid=952371808, Plants used in traditional Native American medicine, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 21 April 2020, at 22:36. Characteristics. [1][2] It grows in wet soil along the borders of the forest, often found in fence corners and along roadsides. Shrub borders. Occurs in wetlands or non- wetlands . It is admired for its compact habit, its lustrous foliage which insects rarely disfigure, its beautiful and abundant flowers, its handsome edible fruit and its brilliant autumnal color. Like all viburnums, the leaves are arranged in opposite pairs on the twigs; they are oval, 5–10 cm (2–4 in) long and 2–5 cm (3⁄4–2 in) broad, wedge-shaped, rounded or subcordate at base, with an acuminate apex and a finely serrated margin, and a winged petiole. Fruit, cone, nut, and seed descriptions. The bark is reddish- to grayish-brown, and broken into small scales. The wood is ill-smelling, dark orange brown, heavy, hard, close-grained, with a density of 0.7303. No serious insect or disease problems. Remove root suckers to control spread unless naturalization is desired. Mildew and leaf spot are occasional problems. Viburnum lentago, commonly called nannyberry, is a large, upright, multi-stemmed, suckering, deciduous shrub which typically grows to 10-18' tall with a spread of 6-12', but may also be grown as a small, single trunk tree which may reach a height of 30'. In autumn they turn a deep red, or red and orange. Isolated populations are found in the Dakotas, Wyoming, Colorado, and the Appalachian Mountains as far south as Kentucky and Virginia. It is easily raised from seeds which, like those of the other American species, do not germinate until the second year after they are planted.[4]. ... New England Distribution and Conservation Status. Viburnum lentago Nannyberry viburnum is a versatile native shrub, offering year-round interest in the landscape, from the showy white flowers in May to the burgundy autumn leaf color and dark blue berries. Use as a small tree, a hedge, in naturalized areas or woodland settings. The fruit is a small round blue-black drupe, 8–16 mm (0.31–0.63 in) long on a reddish stem; it is thick skinned, sweet and rather juicy, and edible. The twigs are pale green and covered with rusty down at first, later becoming dark reddish brown, sometimes glaucous, smooth, tough, flexible, and produce an offensive odor when crushed or bruised. Nannyberry (Viburnum lentago) photo: John Hagstrom. Viburnum lentago L. Facts. Background for native plantings. As suggested by the alternative name sweet viburnum, the fruit is (unlike that of many viburnums) edible. Nannyberry is a leggy shrub that produces intricately-veined leaves with long tips, and flat-topped clusters of... Habitat. The flowers are small, 5–6 mm (0.20–0.24 in) in diameter, with five whitish petals, arranged in large round terminal cymes 5–12 cm (2–4 3⁄4 in) in diameter; flowering is in late spring. The winter budsare light red, covered with pale scurfy down, pr… Flowers give way in autumn to blue-black, berry-like drupes which often persist into winter and are quite attractive to birds and wildlife. Viburnum lentago, commonly called nannyberry, is a large, upright, multi-stemmed, suckering, deciduous shrub which typically grows to 10-18' tall with a spread of 6-12', but may also be grown as a small, single trunk tree which may reach a height of 30'. The calyx is tubular, equally five-toothed, persistent; the corolla is equally five-lobed, imbricate in the bud, cream-white, one-quarter of an inch across; lobes acute, and slightly erose. Nannyberry is in the muskroot (Adoxaceae) family. Suckering habit is conducive to naturalizing. The twigs are pale green and covered with rusty down at first, later becoming dark reddish brown, sometimes glaucous, smooth, tough, flexible, and produce an offensive odor when crushed or bruised.