Hey there! Probably a rare thing indeed at the level of top-boxes on sticks on subs. In the case of horn loaded sub enclosures, like a w or j bin, the way the driver is mounted. Which setting is best depends on the distance from the sub to your ears, to each room boundary, and to the left and right main speakers. I see on several powered subwoofers that have a reverse polarity switch. What this switch does, electrically, is the second easist thing to understand on a subwoofer’s wiring (the easiest is the ‘on/off’ switch). Phase is something else, though even manufacturers sometimes get it wrong. When you buy products through links across our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. If the distance between the sub and the top boxes is causing phase issues at certain problematic frequencies. Moving the subs around will change where and what frequencies this will happen at (there will always be some phasing issues with subs, but you can control them with proper placement). Magnet in or magnet out - it varies from make and model to another. Traditionally the driver faces the same way as a front loaded box, it's just further back and around the corner in a horn enclosure. This quiets the backstage areas. If the top boxes are from a different manufacturer and are wired to respond oppositely to the sub. Low frequencies are very prone to phasing issues. Fun story: Some productions will turn a section of the PA around and tune the phasing to cancel some of the sound out. Low frequencies are very prone to phasing issues. sit down at your listening position an let your buddy switch forth and back, Room EQ Wizard, Windows and Linux and Mac OSX 10.4+, Freeware. be sure to hi-pass your frontsage as close as possible to the point where you low-pass your sub. Quite often it is impossible/impractical to put the subs in a good place, so reversing the phase (flipping the polarity) of one of the subs will alternate the cycle of the sound waves and change how they will interact with each other. I am curious, in what applications would someone use this? Hence the need to flip the polarity. If the cable connecting the sub to the top boxes has been wired incorrectly. Check out this Sound on Sound article if you want to learn more. That explains the scenario of systems that require the use of an external crossover/processor.. With powered subs, maybe it is a handy feature because of all the possible of sub/top configurations you can use - including with horn or front loaded low mids in a multi way PA for example - where despite any necessary time corrections that need to be made, the polarity is the main issue. You should leave it on "normal" unless you are having phase issues. Of course, this requires a processor and not a simple inversion. When you are placing your subs it is important to measure out the distance between both of them, since subs (or all LF) tend to travel in an omni-directional polar pattern, the sound waves from both sources will meet in many places causing constructive and deconstructive interference. Press J to jump to the feed. sometimes, the sub is more "in phase" with the front speakers when you reverse it phase. Just a friendly reminder that political discussion, (including "offhand" and 'sideways' commenting) is, Should I set it to reverse or normal? this way, cancellation are less likely to occur Subreddit dedicated to those who work in the live sound profession, whether professionally or as a volunteer. These days, for whatever reason, it can be the other way around. http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/apr14/articles/the-low-down.htm. So, when a signal is delivered, depending on the box, the diaphragm may be moving forward or backward depending on which way it is mounted. Most subwoofers have a switch on the back that’s labelled ‘Phase’, and has positions of 0 and 180 degrees. This causes certain frequencies to be either louder or quieter in certain areas, so certain people will hear less/more of certain frequencies. Thanks. First, the correct term for this switch is polarity reversal. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts. New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast. if both are out of phase, cancellation can happen in the overlap range. I make mostly pop, and some bass heavy material. When you are placing your subs it is important to measure out the distance between both of them, since subs (or all LF) tend to travel in an omni-directional polar pattern, the sound waves from both sources will meet in many places causing constructive and deconstructive interference.