Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published To see what your friends thought of this book, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concepts of Pollution and Taboo, This book is, of course, a classic. The imprint of structural linguistics on this one is so fresh that at times it almost seems like a quaint historical document more than anything else. Find an opposition upon which some kind of subordinating value is founded, demonstrate that each side of the opposition ne. Simply select your manager software from the list below and click on download. In Purity and Danger Mary Douglas identifies the concern for purity as a key theme at the heart of every society. Social rituals create a reality which would be nothing without them. Contact us if you experience any difficulty logging in. For one thing, she argues, things that cannot be neatly categorized into some preexisting and understandable category, are often considered impure /taboo/ dangerous. Douglas argues that many of the taboos regarding "polluted" or unclean objects in various societies have more to do with moral and symbolic impurity rather than actual hygiene. In any event, there's an easy mastery in the way that Douglas performs what is now a fairly standard maneuver. It's a must have for anyone wanting to explore purity/pollution taboos. In lively and lucid prose she explains its relevance for every reader by revealing its wide-ranging impact on our attitudes to society, values, cosmology and knowledge. Not an easy read, but interesting and extremely worthwhile. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Welcome back. Not only does Douglas highlight the logic inherent in all kinds of cultural systems, she shows that moderns are just as prone to developing such systems as pre-moderns. Unlike Moore Jr.’s work on purity, Douglas’ theory differs enough from Freud to be considered a separate conceptualization. September 12th 2002 The language in this book is dated, but the information and subject of study - dirt and pollution - remains useful, even if just historically. For more information view the SAGE Journals Sharing page. With all the inherent limitations of the field and the fact that quite a bit of this is dated, it's still a good start at thinking of purity independent of hygiene, morality, and the other ways modernists have tried to make sense of expurgation rituals. I mean, what does one really say about a classic of structuralist anthropology? New login is not successful because the max limit of logins for this user account has been reached. It also highlights a broad swath of examples from various cultures and religions. In lively and lucid prose she explains its relevance for every reader by revealing its wide-ranging impact on our attitudes to society, values, cosmology and knowledge. A Little Dirt Never Hurt Anyone:: Knowledge-Making and Contamination in Materials Science, Where There Is Dirt, Is There System? I came to this book looking for some inspiration re modern environmentalist culture’s outlook on chemical pollution. Readable, with occasional humorous comments from the author. Still, I found the book very eyeopening and I can imagine that the theory of pollution is something that can be pretty much used in any essay on cultural anthropology. She follows Emile Durkheim in defining dirt as that which is out of its place (ketchup in fine in the bottle or on the plate, but not on my shirt). However, Douglas does recognise the vital role both scholars played as pioneers of Anthropology as a discipline and attributes many of their misunderstandings to zeitgeist and colonial context. With a specially commissioned introduction by the author which assesses the continuing significance of the work thirty-five years on, this Routledge Classics edition will ensure that Purity and Danger continues to challenge and question well into the new millennium. The book has been hugely influential in many areas of debate - from religion to social theory. Purity and Danger, first published in 1966, justly deserves its place as a classic, and the. Interesting concepts of the interplay between the taboo and the holy, morality and cleanliness, purity and danger; how societies frame their worlds. It has no existence without the rites of friendship. Login failed. I have read and accept the terms and conditions, View permissions information for this article, Click the button below for the full-text content, 24 hours online access to download content. Here they are: force dirt into an existing category and treat accordingly; kill; quarantine; mark as dangerous; or treat as a super-signifier (39-40). Please check you selected the correct society from the list and entered the user name and password you use to log in to your society website. We’d love your help. Members of _ can log in with their society credentials below. It is well written and surprisingly accessible to even those acclimated to the specific disciplines of focus (anthropology and comparative religion). If we step back from her anthropological approach that assumes rituals are static and instead see cultural practices as existing in open systems in which new objects circulate, we might see that this set of options reminds us that dirt is the object of continual cultural struggle and negotiation in regard to how to read it and what to do about it. Why kiss away tears but not snot? How do we learn to live with some filth and yet recoil at other dirt? by Routledge, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of the Concepts of Pollution and Taboo. Despite its many detractors, I found this book fascinating. In lively and lucid prose she explains its relevance for every reader by revealing its wide-ranging impact on our attitudes to society, values, cosmology and knowledge. Like the cuisine book, this makes Leviticus just a. Mary Douglas criticises and debunks the claims of Robertson-Smith and Sir James Frazer that so-called primitive cultures were, collectively and individually, unable to distinguish between the 'sacred and the profane'. The e-mail addresses that you supply to use this service will not be used for any other purpose without your consent. Gabrys and other waste theorists turn to Douglas as a starting point for thinking about the relationship between dirt and systems and then variously amend her conclusions and criticize her methods. There are sections which are all citation, where no idea is really developed, and then there are sections filled with assertions and assumptions that demand significantly more citation and justification. In lively and lucid prose she explains its relevance for every reader by revealing its wide-ranging impact on our attitudes to society, values, cosmology and knowledge. In Purity and Danger Mary Douglas identifies the concern for purity as a key theme at the heart of every society.