Published in the Savoy, after The London Gazette's printing premises at Baynard's Castle are destroyed by a ‘sad and deplorable Fire in Pudding-lane’ that results in a missed issue. Image 'Fall of Nelson' from 'Histoire du Consulat et de l'Empire, faisant suite a l'Histoire de la Revolution Francaise' 1845. This newspaper helped the people of London learn more about the fire and what had happened as they were moving away from the fire and the city. The Great Fire of London was a major conflagration in London that took place between the 2nd and 5th of September in 1666. The Great Fire of London started in a baker’s shop in Pudding Lane on 2 September 1666, and by the time it was extinguished four days later, it had destroyed seven-eighths of the city (373 acres), including more than 13,000 houses and 84 churches as well as St Paul’s Cathedral and much of London Bridge. The London Gazette report on the Great Fire of London 1666. ISSUE 85. London Gazette recording the Fire of London 1666. The fire may be one of the most significant events in the city’s history and is still remembered and commemorated over 350 years later. 3 September 1666. The Gazette was not a newspaper in the modern sense: it was sent by post to subscribers, not printed for … PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY. The Gazette was "Published by Authority" by Henry Muddiman, and its first publication is noted by Samuel Pepys in his diary. The Gazette was not a newspaper in the modern sense: it was sent by post to subscribers, not printed for … It also informed others outside of the city … The London Gazette became the eyes and ears of London during the fire. The London Gazette report on the Great Fire of London 1666 - page 2. his Majesties Naval Stores are kept. The London Gazette was the first to carry news of the Trafalgar. 5.00 a.m. – the time that the last copy of the London Gazette was published before the presses were abandoned on Monday evening. The King returned to London as the plague dissipated, and the Gazette moved too, with the first issue of The London Gazette (labelled No. From Monday, September 3, to Monday, September 10, 1666. 9.00 a.m. – the time that James, Duke of York, took charge of firefighting operations and set up a number of fire command posts around … Gazette Contents. Return to Fire of London Return to Samuel Pepys Home. The King returned to London as the plague dissipated, and the Gazette moved too, with the first issue of The London Gazette (labelled No. The Great Fire of London. 24) being published on 5 February 1666. Image courtesy of British Library on Flickr NKCR. So as though it had pleased God to visit us with his own hand, he hath not, by disfurnishing us with the means of carrying on the War, subjected us to our enemies. 24) being published on 5 February 1666. The London Gazette was first published as The Oxford Gazette on 7 November 1665.Charles II and the Royal Court had moved to Oxford to escape the Great Plague of London, and courtiers were unwilling to touch London newspapers for fear of contagion. Whitehall, Sept. 8. The London Gazette carries a wide range of content. THE LONDON GAZETTE.