At the age of 18, she decided to pursue a career in nursing, working at the progressive New England Hospital for Women and Children. November 05, 2013 In this series, we will tell nursing stories of influential practitioners who made a difference in the field of nursing. Death and Legacy. Nursing Stories: Mary Eliza Mahoney. She was born in Boston, on May 7, 1845, the oldest of three children. Mary Mahoney was named to the Nursing Hall of Fame in 1976 and to the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1993. She died on January 4, 1926, at the age of 80. https://www.sunsigns.org/famousbirthdays/d/profile/mary-mahoney Mary Eliza Mahoney: The First African American Registered Nurse. Monday, February 10, 2020 2020 has been named the Year of the Nurse and Midwife by the World Health Organization. Born in 1845, Mary Eliza Mahoney was the first black nurse in the United States to complete her professional degree. Mary Eliza Mahoney was the first black professional nurse in America, and an active organizer among African American nurses. https://www.asrn.org/journal-chronicle-nursing/282-mary-eliza-mahoney.html https://www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/mary-eliza-mahoney-7330.php Biography of Mary Eliza Mahoney Abstract Mary Eliza Mahoney is recognized for being the first African-American woman in the world of nursing. To celebrate, every month we're highlighting a nurse who has helped change the world. Introduction. With her dedication and great care she was able to open doors for many other women who wanted to share her dream of becoming a nurse. Mary Eliza Mahoney was born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1845. Her grave is located in Woodlawn Cemetery in Everett, Massachusetts. In Dorchester Massachusetts, on May 7, 1845, an extraordinary person in American history was born. Mary Eliza Mahoney As the first African-American registered nurse, Mary Eliza Mahoney changed the world through her efforts to raise the status of nurses of color in the professional workplace. Mary Eliza Mahoney was affected with breast cancer in 1923 and battled the illness for 3 years.