But you need to get there early. Two of Jay Fai's most popular dishes are the drunken noodles with shrimp (pad kee mao goong), top, and the crab omelette (khai jeaw poo), bottom. And Jay Fai appears to have defied logic with something she calls dry tom yum. Suparat Tretachayakorn — a doctor — isn't shocked at all. He and his friends have also ordered Jay Fai's famous tom yum soup, and half a dozen other dishes. It's unbelievable.". And this is the quintessential street food of Bangkok," he insists. "We have the best seats. I love street food. "Actually, I don't normally order tom yum because I know that I'm going to be disappointed at most places," he says. Raan Jay Fai, Bangkok Picture: Dry Tom Yum - Check out Tripadvisor members' 50,044 candid photos and videos of Raan Jay Fai It roughly translates to "Sister Mole," a reference to a birthmark next to her nose. Everybody out there is staring at us, and we're in here enjoying the best meal we'll probably ever have," she says, motioning to the 30 or so people waiting outside in the blistering heat. But because the heat was so high, they browned in a way they hadn’t before, producing what Jay Fay says was “a wonderful taste and aroma.” No oil necessary. "It's faster to cook when using charcoal, to stir-fry vegetables," Jay Fai says. "That sounds embarrassing, but yes, it was. In a good way. "The charcoal makes everything very hot very quickly. So I was like, we're showing up [early] and we're getting a table.". So she taught herself how to make Japanese omelettes and distilled those techniques into a flattened and rolled omelette that’s impossibly light and fluffy, bursting with hefty chunks of crab meat. Both agreed the food was worth the seven-hour wait. "It's pure joy," he says. The Thai version of egg noodles served on the roadside. He's a regular. "I got here at 7:30 [a.m.]," says 24-year old Kashmira Velji, from Austin, Texas, who was determined to try Jay Fai after viewing the chef's star turn on the recent Netflix special Street Food. She wears a wool cap, a gray camouflage shirt with a long black apron and huge safety goggles to ward off the heat and fire. "I give it a 15!" Must try: Crab omelette, dry tom yum, drunken noodles, tom yum. Michael Sullivan for NPR Signing up for the walk-in list is the best bet for many, especially tourists. Two of Jay Fai's most popular dishes are the drunken noodles with shrimp (pad kee mao goong), top, and the crab omelette (khai jeaw poo), bottom. “Jay Fai’s tom yum is one of the best in Thailand,” says Naulkhair. This is something I cherish. "They said they wanted to invite me to an event, a gala dinner, and I said, 'Oh, my, a gala dinner, no thank you. "The one here I order every time.". I don't know. Her reputation did, too. In fact, she spent ten years working as a seamstress and likely would have continued had a devastating fire not destroyed all of her possessions, sewing machine included. I know my strength. Kashmira Velji and Ana Wong (front table, right) got to the restaurant at 7:30 a.m., even though it didn't open until 2 p.m., and were able to score the top spot on the walk-in list. "It's so fresh, and it's a really big lump," he says. While she has long been known throughout Bangkok, it was only when Michelin awarded her a star did the world take notice. She says she learned to cook from her mom, who sold noodle soup with pork and chicken. "I experimented until I got a dish right, to make a dish people wanted.". “Whenever anyone asks, I say I’m not tired. Chef Jay Fai wears a wool cap and safety goggles to ward off the heat from the charcoal fires in the alley where she cooks all of the restaurant's meals. “Jay Fai’s tom yum is one of the best in Thailand,” says Naulkhair. And more charcoal — always more charcoal — to keep the heat consistent. Â. They taught me to be brave. Both agreed the food was worth the seven-hour wait. Kashmira Velji and Ana Wong (front table, right) got to the restaurant at 7:30 a.m., even though it didn't open until 2 p.m., and were able to score the top spot on the walk-in list. Jay Fai is the most famous street food chef in the world—with a Michelin star to boot. You can try to make a reservation, but the place — named after its chef/owner, a local legend — is usually booked a month or two out. "They can't do it. I was trying to make money but I was facing a dead end. hide caption. ”It blew my mind,” says Naulkhair. It’s pretty amazing.” She even makes a dried version composed of all the aromatics rendering tom yum into the crowd-favorite dish it is today, but without the broth. The 74-year-old Jay Fai cooks everything herself — over two blazing charcoal fires, in the alley next to the busy street, while patrons snap pictures of her from a distance. Then I came back to experiment at home.". Which she did, though she had to be helped to the stage when her name was called. Bangkok is legendary for its fun and its food. I ask her how that's possible. In her 20s at the time and at a loss for what to do next, she began helping out her mother, soon purchasing a wok to start practicing herself. She's got a special power. "This is probably going to be the cheapest Michelin star meal we'll ever have." "It's very difficult to execute well, very difficult to do it justice like this," he says. You know it’s going to be good. And part of the fun, they both say, is watching the maestro at work. And on Netflix’s latest smash culinary hit, ‘Street Food,’ which follows in the illustrious footsteps of its gastronomic predecessors (Chef’s Table, Jiro Dreams of Sushi, The Mind of a Chef, Cooked), we get an inside look into the street food scene in Thailand’s capital—one that Jay Fai unequivocally reigns over.