Nine in 10 (89%) principals say that ultimately a principal should be held accountable for everything that happens to the children in a school; 74% of teachers agree in 2012, compared with 60% in 1989. This research combined both quantitative and qualitative methods to gain a clear picture of attitudes and perceptions among teachers and principals. Principals who feel great stress several days a week are more likely to work in schools where no more than some students are performing at or above grade level in English language arts or math (57% vs. 43% of those in schools where most students perform at or above grade level). MetLife Foundation draws on the findings of the annual MetLife Survey of the American Teacher to inform its support for education. In contrast, in schools with one third or fewer low-income students, 91% of principals and 83% of teachers say that most of their students are achieving at this level. Sometimes as a leader you can feel your motivation for the project or the organization fall flat. Seven in 10 (69%) principals say the job responsibilities are not very similar to five years ago. The MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: Challenges for School Leadership (2012) captures the viewpoints and experiences of teachers and principals working to meet those responsibilities in an environment of continued strained resources and increased expectations to strengthen educational outcomes. Thought leaders were drawn from different education organizations from a list provided by MetLife and offered a range of knowledge and expertise in education leadership from principals’ and teachers’ perspectives, in Common Core State Standards, and in assessment. Half of teachers now function in formal leadership roles such as department chair, instructional resource, teacher mentor, or leadership team member. Principals in secondary schools and schools where only some students are reaching grade level in English language arts and mathematics indicate the greatest stress. While most principals report having a great deal of control in hiring teachers and making decisions about teachers’ schedules, fewer than half have great control over removing teachers or over curriculum and instruction. The data were weighted to key demographic variables to align with the national population of the respective groups. The survey underscores the fact that teachers today play a key part in the leadership of their schools. We can deliver a world class system. The decreases in professional development have a sizable relationship to a school’s financial condition: Teachers who report that their school’s budget has decreased in the past 12 months are three times as likely as others to report that there have been decreases in time to collaborate with other teachers (35 percent vs. 11 percent) and in professional development opportunities (27 percent vs. 8 percent). Staying Motivated. Teacher satisfaction has declined 23 percentage points since 2008, from 62 percent to 39 percent very satisfied, including a drop of 5 percentage points in the last 12 months—the lowest level reported since 1987. To do this, Cran encourages envisioning the end result. The responsibilities of school leadership have changed significantly in recent years, leading to a job that principals say has become too complex and highly stressful. Half (50%) of teachers and 40% of principals say managing the school budget and resources to meet school needs is very challenging; overall, 86% of teachers and 78% of principals say this is challenging or very challenging for school leaders. Time for collaboration and professional learning remains limited: More than six in ten teachers say that time to collaborate with other teachers (65 percent) and professional development opportunities (63 percent) have either decreased or stayed the same during the past 12 months. Job satisfaction among principals has decreased nine percentage points in less than five years, to 59% very satisfied from 68% very satisfied in 2008. Fifty-one percent of teachers also say they are at least somewhat interested in teaching in the classroom part-time combined with other roles or responsibilities in their school or district, including 23 percent who are extremely or very interested in this option. School leaders today say that key responsibilities are challenging, particularly those schools alone cannot address. Greater proportions of teachers and principals in high-needs, than in other, schools report that maintaining an adequate supply of effective teachers and engaging parents and the community present challenges for their school leaders. By visiting this website, certain cookies have already been set, which you may delete and block. Less satisfied principals are more likely to find it challenging to maintain an academically rigorous environment and an adequate supply of effective teachers in their schools, while less satisfied teachers are more likely to be working in schools where budgets and time for professional development and collaboration have decreased in the last 12 months. Factors whose origins are beyond school control represent the most significant challenges: Three-quarters of teachers and principals or more say that it is challenging or very challenging for school leadership to manage budgets and resources to meet school needs (86 percent of teachers; 78 percent of principals, address the individual needs of diverse learners (78 percent of teachers; 83 percent of principals), and engage parents and the community in improving the education of students (73 percent of teachers; 72 percent of principals). Nine in 10 principals (93%) and teachers (92%) say they are knowledgeable about the Common Core. The survey of principals was conducted by telephone between October 9 and November 9, 2012 among 500 U.S. K-12 public school principals. By continuing to acknowledge these challenges, and collaborate toward resolutions, school leaders will be best positioned to identify solutions from which schools across the nation can benefit. Most principals and a majority of teachers consider implementation of the Common Core a challenge for their schools, and a majority of teachers and nearly half of principals report that teachers are already using the Common Core a great deal in their teaching. Principals’ satisfaction with their jobs in the publics chools has decreased nine percentage points since it was last measured in 2008. More principals find it challenging to maintain an adequate supply of effective teachers in urban schools (60% vs. 43% in suburban schools and 44% in rural schools) and in schools with two-thirds or more low-income students (58% vs. 37% in schools with one-third or fewer). 2. The job of principal is becoming more complex and stressful. Although the demand for 21st century skills has spawned a good deal of enthusiasm, the reality of curriculum in K–12 education remains firmly rooted in the traditions of past centuries. You should stand for the people who bring you down. Tell me how we can improve. #1 – Budget Constraints Visit our updated, ISHN survey: Ergo injuries are the top hazard challenging EHS pros, Computer simulation shows more job control = less stress, ISO Survey: 2007 shows ISO management systems standards implemented in 175 countries (11/14). Principal and teacher job satisfaction is declining. The survey was conducted by telephone among 1,000 U.S. K-12 public school teachers and 500 public school principals in October and November, 2012. Principals and teachers have similar views on academic challenges, but diverge somewhat on their priorities for leadership. You must have JavaScript enabled to enjoy a limited number of articles over the next 30 days. Half of teachers (51 percent) have a leadership role in their school, such as department chair, instructional resource, teacher mentor, or leadership team member. Teachers take leadership in schools and think principals are doing a good job. A majority of teachers and principals report that their school’s budget has decreased in the last 12 months, and even greater proportions of teachers and principals indicate that it is challenging or very challenging for school leaders to manage budgets and resources to meet school needs. Challenges cited by educators are greater in high-needs schools. While national experts on teaching, standards, and leadership interviewed for the design of the study have raised significant concerns about the readiness and capacity of schools to implement the Common Core State Standards, a majority of teachers (62 percent) and nearly half of principals (46 percent) report teachers in their schools already are using the Common Core a great deal in their teaching this year. The survey of teachers was conducted by telephone between October 5 and November 11, 2012 among 1,000 U.S. K-12 public school teachers. Teachers and principals are more likely to be very confident that teachers have the ability to implement the Common Core (53 percent of teachers; 38 percent of principals) than they are very confident that the Common Core will improve the achievement of students (17 percent of teachers; 22 percent of principals) or better prepare students for college and the workforce (20 percent of teachers; 24 percent of principals). Teachers and principals also rate the responsibilities of addressing the individual needs of diverse learners and engaging parents and the community in improving the education of students as significant leadership challenges.