Cycling the Natchez Trace Parkway (NPS Photo) There are no traffic lights or billboards -- it's beautiful. Learn how to traverse it by bicycle. The Natchez Trace Parkway is a beautiful 444-mile drive from Natchez, Mississippi to Nashville, Tennessee. The Natchez Trace Parkway Double Arched Bridge, mile-marker 430. Natchez Trace Parkway Headquarters Visitors Center Milepost 266. Plan enough time to immerse yourself in the Southern beauty along the way. No matter how you travel the Natchez Trace, knowing where to get food, gas, and lodging can make your trip a much more enjoyable one. To get the best look at the blooming flowers, take a break from driving and experience more outdoor recreational activities, like cycling or hiking. I highly recommend that if you are leaving from Nashville, pass this stop early in the day and hit it on the way back to town for a perfectly timed sunset picture. This Visitors Center is the quintessential place to stop for all things related to the Trace. Originally a series of pathways for Native Americans, hunters and traders, the Old Trace was simply the best way for people to make their way from one place to another. We are quickly approaching April, when the dogwoods reach their peak. The town of Natchez, the parkway’s origination point, is believed to be the oldest European settlement on the Mississippi River. The historic route has seen 10,000 years of North American history and commemorates the most significant highway of the Old Southwest.. H istorically used by bisons traveling north to find salt licks, the Natchez Trace is now a scenic drive from Natchez, Mississippi to Nashville, Tennessee. The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444 mile (715 km) National Park bicycle route that ESPN calls one of the ten best biking roads in America. Weather Emergencies on the Natchez Trace Parkway It is easy to have an enjoyable visit on the Natchez Trace Parkway, but when mother nature has a bad day, you need to be prepared for weather emergencies . This stop has the best view found on the trace. Beginning in Natchez, Mississippi and running 444 miles to Nashville, Tennessee (or vice versa), the Natchez Trace Parkway follows the historic Old Natchez Trace through three states. Spring is the perfect time to visit the Natchez Trace for dogwood blooms. Originally a Native American trading route, the modern Natchez Trace Parkway was built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps and is a National Parks System-affiliated byway with end points outside of Nashville and in namesake Natchez.The two-lane road, which is closed to semi-trucks, is a tranquil and beautiful drive, where you can often spot birds, turkey and deer. Initially used by Native Americans who were following the tracks of large game such as bison, the Trace became an important trail for settlers, slave traders and soldiers.