One variety was called the qinglong ji (Chinese: 青龍戟; lit. There were many different ways to use a halberd: you could drive the point straight into someone, slice them with the axe blade, hit them with the shaft then hook them in the gap between the axe blade and shaft. Search nearly 14 million words and phrases in more than 470 language pairs. The earliest 戟 Halberd (Ji) discovered by archaeologists were in the Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BC). of the Eastern Zhou Dynasty. This E-Book is available to you for download at USD 9.99, and formatted to A5-size for easy printing. Ancient Chinese Military Equipment Mobile Watch Tower Ancient Chinese warfare often involved attack and defend a walled city, thus mobile watchtowers were regularly used by both offensive and defensive parties in the combat, as they could be used to observe the activities on the top of the city wall by the attackers or monitor the situation outside the wall by the defenders. They were used in one form or another for over 3000 years, from at least as early as the Zhou dynasty, until the end of the Qing dynasty. There were test-cutting using a real sharp Halberd on animal flesh, to test its effectiveness. Shu for example is much smaller than the heads of other polearms. The ji (pronunciation: , English approximation: / dʒ iː / jee, Chinese: 戟; pinyin: jǐ) was a Chinese polearm, translated into English as halberd, used in one form or another for over 3000 years, from at least as early as the Zhou dynasty until the end of the Qing dynasty.They are still used for training purposes in many Chinese martial arts However, the, The techniques of the Halberd are derived from the, To instantly access the special subscribers area for. Interestingly, the word 戟 shares the same pronunciation as the word 吉, … Your Ancient Halberd stock images are ready. Therefore, even today, you can see the Halberd at major festivals like the Chinese New Year. Indeed, much of China’s history thereafter involves war… The Chinese Halberd & Long Shaft Axe are 2 iconic Chinese polearms, and the martial arts manuals for them were written by 程子頤 (Cheng Zi Yi). According to Cheng Zi Yi, Long Shaft Axes are effective in combat with simple techniques, hence training troops to use it is easier and yet still effective in combat. The wielder could strike with the shaft, with the option of then pulling the weapon back to hook with a side blade; or, he could slap his opponent with the flat side of the blade to knock him off his horse. To instantly access the special subscribers area for FREE download of ancient martial arts manual, please enter your email on the right. The Ji is popularized through a historical character known as Lü Bu. Ming period Da Bang (大棒) and Jia Dao Gun (夾刀棍) can be considered distant descendants of this weapon. [2][3] They had multiple means of attack: the side blade or blades, the spear tip, plus often a rear counterweight that could be used to strike the opponent. Download all free or royalty-free photos and vectors. He is the nephew of Master Cheng Zong You, who famously wrote manuals on the Long-Saber, Spear, Crossbow and Shaolin Staff. He called himself “August Sovereign,” the name that all emperors of China used The ji was initially a hybrid between a spear and a dagger-axe. This truly ancient weapon predates even the Chariot and would later include spear points as they evolved into the Chi, or Chinese Halberd. The spear is also sometimes called a mao, which is sometimes used to designate polearms with a wavy snake-like spearhead. : 'square sky ji'), which had a spear tip with crescent blades on both sides. There are stances and techniques mentioned in this Halberd manual which are not explained nor drawn, because these are documented in the Shaolin Staff manual already. In the Song dynasty, several weapons were referred to as ji, but they were developed from spears, not from ancient ji. Only when chariots began to be replaced by larger infantry armies did the sword become a more valuable asset to soldiers. Various ancient Chinese polearms. The Chinese Halberd & Long Shaft Axe are 2 iconic Chinese polearms, and the martial arts manuals for them were written by 程子頤 (, The earliest 戟 Halberd (Ji) discovered by archaeologists were in the Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BC). The Chinese bronze age saw a great deal of military competition between city-rulers eager to grab the riches of their neighbours, and there is no doubt that success in this endeavour legitimised reigns and increased the welfare of the victors and their people. His weapon of choice was the Fang Tian Hua Ji (方天画戟). The Ge is considered the most characteristic weapon of ancient China, having been wielded by warriors during the early Dynasties of Shang, Zhou and Han. It was a relatively common infantry weapon in Ancient China, and was also used by cavalry and charioteers. An authentic ancient Chinese huge bronze Ge (dagger-axe) halberd blade that dates to the Spring and Autumn period 770-476 B.C. Ge (two dagger-axes at left), ji (two variants at centre), and Song-dynasty ji (two at right), A king of Xia, Jie, holding an ancient ji, A qinglong ji (azure dragon ji) from the Qing-dynasty encyclopedia Gujin Tushu Jicheng, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ji_(polearm)&oldid=991006561, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles containing Chinese-language text, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 27 November 2020, at 19:37.